Healing Spirit 0 comments on Finding your jump off point

Finding your jump off point

This week’s blog may seem to contradict last week’s blog about the art of toe dipping, as perhaps your definition of jumping off likely means into water that is deep enough to allow it.

In this context, the jump off point is the place that you choose to begin when you are ready to consciously start unpacking the baggage cancer has left you.

However, I still like to call it a jump off point, because it is an act of bravery and courage to consciously decide that you are going to unpack that baggage. The experience of having cancer is so multi-layered, so complex emotionally, that it is reasonable to feel the desire to avoid unpacking it. It can seem overwhelming to do.

With that in mind, I define the jump off point as:

The jump off point is the entry point, in any given moment, that is going to allow you to begin the process of exploration through dialogue, writing, and art. It is the intuitive place inside of you that knows you are about to strike gold.

The jump off point is the place closest to the surface (ie your conscious mind) in which you are aware you feel something profound- whether it be a memory, a thought or a feeling

When I am in a healing session, the jump off point is one of the first things I guide my clients to feel energetically. It is something that takes practice, but over time it becomes easier and easier.

I often use the image of tentacles or roots to describe what it is like to follow a jump off point. When you are in the process of exploration- it can be so surprising to see how your psyche has interconnected your ‘here and now’ life experiences with the ‘there and then’ of the past. The more comfortable you can become with accepting that reality, the more likely you are to heal.

I often find that healing the present draws certain parallels to the unfinished business of the past- something that we begrudgingly can come to accept. Dang it universe for directing us towards resolving our suffering! (yes, a little humor can go a long way towards loosening the tension this brings)

Where do you feel you are being asked to jump off from? I’d love to hear it in the comments below or send me a private message via email!

PS- When you find your jump off point, I still highly recommend that you practice the art of toe dipping. Slow and steady wins the race!

-Stephanie McLeod-Estevez, LCPC, is an art therapist and breast cancer survivor, and a former oncology counselor at the Dempsey Center. She began Creative Transformations to help others who are healing emotionally from cancer. Through Creative Transformations, she works with people in person and online to offer the self assessment toolcancer coaching, an Art as Therapy program, virtual workshops, and this weekly blog. Sign up today so you never miss a blog and find us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

 

Healing Self, Healing Spirit 0 comments on Reminder: put your nipples on

Reminder: put your nipples on

In just a few short days, my family and I will be flying to Spain, to see my husband’s family. As you might imagine, we are in the midst of the final push for getting ready- which means lots and lots of to-do lists. This time, I have an additional to do that was never there before- to put on my nipples.

As my breast cancer peeps can relate, this item is a crucial one towards feeling more like yourself again. There are many options- but I chose silicone, paste on nipples, after meeting Michelle- the owner and creator of Pink Perfect. She offers “ready to wear” nipples in every tone, shade, shape and size as well as custom made nipples for women who have a single mastectomy and wish to match their native nipple. I highly recommend her products!

It has been 11 years since we have gone back to Spain as a family, the last time we were there my oldest child was 5 months old. My mother-in-law was so proud, she fell in love with him and was so impressed by how rolly polly he was. She would exclaim to everyone one we came across that she knew (which feels like half the population of the small city that she lives in)- “SOLO TETA”. Solo teta translates to “just breast” in English- and in this case breast milk. She wanted everyone to understand that my body was fully responsible for creating such an exquisite child- and her praise made me laugh and smile at the same time.

It has been 20 years since my husband and I married in Spain, we were only 24 at the time. In those twenty years we have had a lifetime of experiences, we were caregiver to my mom before she died from metastatic breast cancer, both of our fathers have died, we created two children, we both obtained advanced degrees, I had cancer… it was never our intention to go so long between visits to Spain, but the curveballs kept coming and we had to keep recalibrating. Although we might have preferred a less tumultuous time line, we have nevertheless become more resilient for sticking through it together.

I have a feeling that this time, my mother-in-law will still be proud, and perhaps she will exclaim- No Tetas (no breasts) to everyone we pass, since that has changed since our last visit. If she does, I will celebrate right alongside her, with my paste on nipples and silicone boobs- because I am very lucky to have this chance to return again to a land I love. Something that could have been robbed from me had the cancer treatment not kicked cancer’s ass.

As I soak in this experience of a lifetime, the chance to be present with my husband and children as they encounter a major piece of their heritage, the chance to hug and kiss all of the wonderful family and friends we have there, the chance to return to my second home… I will be absorbing it with the deep appreciation for life that cancer has brought me, knowing that life can change on a dime.

This practice- of drinking in the moment with my body, mind, spirit, and self is something that we can all cultivate as an homage to the value of being alive. I wonder- what are your special moments and places (big or small) that bring you fully alive? I would love it if you would share them with me, either in the comments below or by email.

-Stephanie McLeod-Estevez, LCPC, is an art therapist and breast cancer survivor, and a former oncology counselor at the Dempsey Center. She began Creative Transformations to help others who are healing from a life threatening illness or injury. Through Creative Transformations, she works with people in person and online to offer cancer coaching, an Art as Therapy program, workshops, and this weekly blog. Check out the individual packages, the self assessment tool, and virtual workshops.  Sign up today so you never miss a blog and find us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

Healing Self, Healing Spirit, Intimacy and Parenting 0 comments on When the waves of grief come…

When the waves of grief come…

As we have identified, no one goes through cancer unscathed. Recently, this has been coming up in a number of different ways- personally, it is seeing the lingering impact on my youngest son who was 5 and starting kindergarten when I was diagnosed. Knowing that I couldn’t fully protect him from that experience- and the lingering stress that follows, is something that weighs heavy on my heart.

Another way that it has come up is related to survivor guilt.  From my perspective, survivor guilt manifests from the experience of watching people we love go through cancer treatment and/or having them die from cancer.

Just like someone who walks away from a plane crash, we wonder why were spared and they were not… we feel helpless to soothe their loved ones… we feel badly when we are not fully grateful… the list goes on and on.

Yet, we are tribal people and we need the connection to others who have been there… being connected is a crucial component of healing AND it also asks us to confront how unjust life can be, how little control we have over outcomes, the mortality of others and ourselves…  As Robert Neimeyer wrote:

We are wired for attachment in a world of impermanence. How we negotiate that tension shapes who we become.

To be fully alive and present, we need to find ways to allow ourselves to process the many losses that come along with life. Death is certainly a loss and a grief process that we see as valid, although we frequently underestimate the time needed to fully grieve. All endings, not just death, have components of grief and loss, in part because when something comes to an end, we reflect upon the experience and the thoughts, feelings and expectations we had about it.

Grieving when you are also experiencing survivor guilt becomes more complex, because we share the common experience of having cancer and thus inevitably we think about ourselves.  The tension that comes from trying to do both can cause us to shut down, withdraw, become overwhelmed, judge ourselves… and this tension can easily go unnoticed and underground.

The taboos about talking about death and dying, the difficulty of honoring our own process and needs when we know someone “has it worse”, our tendency to compare and to ruminate about things that are out of our control…

All of these things add to the shroud of silence that often accompanies the waves of grief. For the waves of grief inevitably come with the gift of life.  As the quote from Havelock Ellis in the meme above reminds us:

All the art of living lies in a fine mingling of letting go and holding on

In order to walk through our survival guilt, our grief, we need to find small ways that we can practice letting go and holding on. When we do this, we find the ability to release the tension that keeps us stuck and unable to be fully embody what we have been through. When we do this, we begin to find the ability to be alive and connected to ourselves and to those we love, learning to surf the waves despite the challenges we and our loved ones face.

Tell me, what is a small gesture or act you can do right now to practice letting go and holding on? I’d love to hear it, shoot me an email, send me a PM or write below. XO

– Stephanie McLeod-Estevez, LCPC, is an art therapist and breast cancer survivor, and a former oncology counselor at the Dempsey Center. She began Creative Transformations to help others who are healing from a life threatening illness or injury. Through Creative Transformations, she works with people in person and online to offer cancer coaching, an Art as Therapy program, workshops, and this weekly blog. Check out the individual packages. Sign up today so you never miss a blog and find us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

Healing Spirit, Survivorship 0 comments on Staying connected to the connections that nourish us

Staying connected to the connections that nourish us

Last weekend I had the opportunity to be an exhibitor at the YSC national summit for young women diagnosed with breast cancer. It was such an amazing experience to connect with others who have been through similar circumstances. I had a lot of meaningful conversations with attendees and other exhibitors, the energy of sharing purpose and passion is invigorating.

In this world of technology, we don’t always get the opportunity to meet face-to-face.  I am forever grateful for both technology and the ability to meet face-to-face, because both help us to decrease isolation and increase our ability to feel better, knowing that we are not alone and that many of our concerns are shared.  As the Swedish proverb reminds us:

Shared joy is double joy; shared sorrow is half a sorrow

I am still digesting the experience of being surrounded by my community, so in honor of that this week’s post is about maintaining the connection to the connections that nourish us.  Often we can’t have ongoing face-to-face time with our community, so finding a way to hold onto the experience is just as important as having it.

I like the image of a camel, a beautiful and strong animal who can store away the energy of food and water to allow it to pass through a dessert, where resources will be scarce. A camel can go a long time without replenishing its stores, yet the camel must be mindful of its needs, so that it can survive.

Taking this metaphor of the camel, can you take a moment to recall a time in your life in which you felt really connected with others.  A time in which you felt understood and in which you gave the gift of understanding.  What do you notice?  How does it make you feel?  Can you visualize (or draw) what your camel hump looks like?  What does the hump need to easily circulate this nourishing energy throughout your system?

If you happen to be one of those people who struggles to add yourself to a priority list, you may often walk a very fine line between that which is necessary for survival and that which is harmful self-depletion.  If that is the case, it is really important to work with someone who can support you in examining why this is and what needs to change in order to shift the cycle.  In my work with others, I often find it is our deep seeded beliefs that drive these actions of deprivation and depletion. If this sounds familiar to you, set up a consultation call to explore the possibility of working together.

– Stephanie McLeod-Estevez, LCPC, is an art therapist and breast cancer survivor, and a former oncology counselor at the Dempsey Center. I began Creative Transformations to help others who are healing from a life threatening illness or injury. Through Creative Transformations, I work with people in person and online to offer cancer coaching, an Art as Therapy program, workshops, and this weekly blog. Check out the individual packages I offer. Sign up today so you never miss a blog and find us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

 

Healing Self, Healing Spirit 0 comments on Finding Inspiration

Finding Inspiration

This week my thoughts keep circling back to the importance of inspiration… I like to think of inspiration as the energetic fuel that keeps us going when we are going through times of great transition and change.  The proverbial light at the end of the tunnel that bostlers our spirit.

Inspiration also means the act of drawing air into the lungs.  Air, naturally, is the most basic need that we have for survival.  Therefore, inspiration not only is perhaps the fuel for our spirit, but also the fuel for our bodies.

When we practice the art of mindful breathing- or inspiration- we practice the art of being in the NOW.  Being able to stay in the present is so valuable for our ever busy minds, that wish to dash off and dash away from the present. Thus we have inspiration to thank for calming the mind.

When we feel inspired, when we are breathing, when we are finding a stillness in our mind and body, we find our way back to ourselves.  We might not always recognize the person we find, because cancer can impact us in fundamental ways, but for most of us there is at least a glimmer of who we have always considered ourselves to be.  Especially if we focus on the act of simply being with our breath.

You don’t have to do extraordinary things to connect with inspiration, although it is always inspiring to see examples of authenticity and bravery- like the remarkable breast cancer survivors who walked the catwalk this week at New York fashion week, representing AnaOno Intimates. Or the story of Patti McCarthy who hiked through cancer treatment in order to keep herself reminded of her passions, “A passion that would let me live life, and not be swallowed up by cancer”.

Whatever form it might take, take some time to find inspiration.  Feed yourself, feed your soul and share it with others as a reminder to breathe.

As Marty Rubin reminds us:

Sometimes just breathing is enough

And I might add- the only thing that is possible for you at this time…

– Stephanie McLeod-Estevez, LCPC, is an art therapist and breast cancer survivor, and a former oncology counselor at the Dempsey Center. She began Creative Transformations to help others who are healing from a life threatening illness or injury. Through Creative Transformations, Stephanie works with people in person and online to offer cancer coaching, a DIY Individual Art Therapy program to enhance any healing work you are undertaking; workshops; and this weekly blog. Sign up today so you never miss one by visiting our website, Creative Transformations, where you will also find the links to our Facebook, Twitter and Instagram pages.

Healing Self, Healing Spirit 0 comments on For the new year

For the new year

This week I am taking a little break from writing, but I wanted to close out my final #TherapyThursday post with some classic, inspirational words by Ralph Waldo Emerson:

What lies behind us and what lies before us are small matters compared to what lies within us.  And when we bring what lies within us out into the world, miracles happen.

When you have or have had cancer, what lies within you is the foundation for resiliency.  Honoring our needs, setting realistic expectations of ourselves, taking space from relationships that drain us while opening up to relationships that feed you, these are the components of a strong foundation.

Working through the trauma that comes with cancer allows us to tap into our deepest sense of self, the part of us that has evolved towards self actualization, a process that continually unfolds. When we allow that part of us out into the world as we work through the trauma, miracles do happen for that helps the collective conscience of us all.

I wish you all a Happy New Year, should you have a topic that you would like me to address in an upcoming blog, write in the comments below or send me an email: [email protected].

– Stephanie McLeod-Estevez, LCPC, is an art therapist and breast cancer survivor, and a former oncology counselor at the Dempsey Center. She began Creative Transformations to help others who are healing from a life threatening illness or injury. Through Creative Transformations, Stephanie works with people in person and online to offer cancer coaching, a DIY Individual Art Therapy program to enhance any healing work you are undertaking; workshops; and this weekly blog. Sign up today so you never miss one by visiting our website, Creative Transformations, where you will also find the links to our Facebook, Twitter and Instagram pages.